Wednesday, August 28, 2013

AP WORLD HISTORY SYLLABUS

NNPS AP World History Syllabus 1


Advanced Placement World History

I. Overview of the Course

Advanced Placement (AP) World History is designed to offer you the equivalent of an introductory college level course in

world history. You will learn the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to understand how global processes and

contacts developed in interaction with different types of human societies. In addition, you will use the steps a historian

would to analyze historical events and evidence.

II. Course Objectives (Curriculum Requirements)

Themes: AP World History highlights five overarching themes that will receive equal and explicit attention

throughout the course.

Theme 1: Interaction between Humans and the Environment

1. Demography and disease

2. Migration

3. Patterns of settlement

4. Technology

Theme 2: Development and Interaction of Cultures

1. Religions

2. Belief systems, philosophies, and ideologies

3. Science and technology

4. The arts and architecture

Theme 3: State-Building, Expansion, and Conflict

1. Political structures and forms of governance

2. Empires

3. Nations and nationalism

4. Revolts and revolutions

5. Regional, trans-regional, and global structures and organizations

Theme 4: Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems

1. Agricultural and pastoral production

2. Trade and commerce

3. Labor systems

4. Industrialization

5. Capitalism and socialism

Theme 5: Development and Transformation of Social Structures

1. Gender roles and relations

2. Family and kinship

3. Racial and ethnic constructions

4. Social and economic classes

NNPS AP World History Syllabus 2

Habits of Mind: The AP World History course addresses specific academic skills, as well as content

knowledge. These skills, called habits of mind, will be addressed throughout the course.

1. Crafting Historical Arguments from Historical Evidence

 Ability to define and frame a question about the past and to address that question through the construction of an

argument

 Capacity to describe, analyze, and evaluate the arguments of others in light of available evidence

 Ability to identify, describe, and evaluate evidence about the past from diverse sources

 Consistently analyze such features of historical evidence as audience, purpose, point of view, format, argument,

limitations, and context germane to the historical evidence considered

2. Chronological Reasoning

 Ability to identify, analyze, and evaluate the relationships between multiple historical causes and effects

 Distinguish between those that are long-term and proximate, and among causation, coincidence, and correlation

 Ability to recognize, analyze, and evaluate the dynamics of historical continuity and change over periods of time

 Ability to describe, analyze, evaluate, and construct models of historical periodization that historians use to

categorize events into discrete blocks and to identify turning points.

3. Comparison and contextualization

 Ability to describe, compare, and evaluate multiple historical developments within one society, one or more

developments across or between different societies, and in various chronological and geographical contexts

 Ability to connect historical developments to specific circumstances of time and place

2. Historical Interpretation and synthesis

 Ability to describe, analyze, evaluate, and create diverse interpretations of the past

 Be alert to differences and take care not to impose the values and viewpoints of their own societies on the many

different societies being studied

 Arrive at meaningful and persuasive understandings of the past by applying all of the other historical thinking skills

Virginia Standards of Learning: In addition to AP course content, this course will cover the Virginia

Standards of Learning for World History and Geography to 1500 A.D. and World History and Geography 1500

A.D. to the Present.

III. Required Textbooks

The textbooks for this course are college level textbooks.

1. Bulliet, Richard, et al. The Earth and It’s People: A Global History. 5th ed. 2011

2. Riley, Gerome, Lembright, Myers, and Yoon. Global Experience: Readings in World History to 1550, Vol. 1

3. Stearns, et al. Documents in World History, Vol. 2. 5th ed.

In addition, a variety of other readings and diverse primary and secondary sources will be used during the

course. The teacher will provide these materials or students will have access to them via the school media

center or the Internet.

III. Grading

Your academic progress will be evaluated through a variety of assessments with an emphasis on critical thinking

and in-depth reading and writing.

Marking Period Grades will be calculated as follows:

50% = Tests and Quarterly Assessments

30% = Quizzes

20% = Class Activities, Essays, Performance Assessments.

NNPS AP World History Syllabus 3

Semester Grade will be calculated as follows:

40% = First Quarter (9 Weeks)

40% = Second Quarter (9 Weeks)

20% = Exam.

The Advanced Placement Exam is administered in May to all students enrolled in AP World History. The test consists of 70

multiple-choice questions and 3 essays. If you perform well, you may earn college credits and be exempt from taking a

World History course in college.

The VA Standards of Learning (SOL) End-of-Course Tests for World History and Geography to 1500 A.D. and World History

and Geography 1500 A.D. to the Present are also administered in January and May respectively. They consist of 70

Multiple-choice questions. Students who pass the tests will receive verified credits towards high school graduation.

III. Expectations

Pages of Reading

PER CLASS

Hours of study

PER CLASS

Tests, essays, papers,

PER QUARTER

Performance

Assessments

30 or more 2 – 3

 2 – 3 Unit Tests

 5 – 8 writings/essays

 Daily reading/Chapter quizzes

 Quarterly Assessment

 4 major

performance

assessments

IV. Course Outline and Pacing Guide

AP World History is a full academic year course (two semesters) and is organized into four quarters that are each nine

weeks long.

Please note the following abbreviations in the course outline and pacing guide that follows on the next pages: SOL refers to

the VA Standards of Learning and WH refers to the World History SOL.

NNPS AP World History Syllabus 4

QUARTER 1

Unit 1: Foundations (8000 B.C.E. – 2,500 B.C.E.)

Time Estimate: 1 week, 3 extended block sessions

AP Themes: 1 – 5 VA Standards of Learning: SOL WHI 1a – 2d

Key Concepts

1.1 Big Geography and the Peopling of the Earth

1.2 The Neolithic Revolution and Early Agricultural Societies

Topics

A. The Peopling of East Africa, Eurasia, Australia, and the Americas

B. Characteristics of early societies, development of civilization

 Mesopotamia, the Nile River Valley and Sub-Saharan Africa, the Indus River Valley, the Yellow River or Huang He Valley, Papua

New Guinea, Mesoamerica, and the Andes

C. The world’s religions, social structure, and gender issues

Assignments and Assessments

A. Readings

1. Textbook: Bulliet, et al., Chapter 1

2. Riley, Gerome, Lembright, Myers, and Yoon. Global Experience: Readings in World History to 1550, Vol. 1, pp. 1-16

3. Diamond, Jared. The Worst Mistake in the History of The Human Race Discover Magazine, May 1987, pp. 64-66.

4. Hunter Gatherers. Noble or Savage The Economist, December 19, 2007

5. Robinson, Kirsti. Was Adopting Agriculture Our Biggest Mistake? Student Pulse.Com 2011

B. Visual and Quantitative Sources

 Early Centers of Plant and Animal Domestication (Bulliet, Map 1.1)

C. Assignments

1. Group work: “Read-Pair-Share” activity on creation stories from prehistory. The source analysis will include identifying the

point of view, the intended purpose/audience, and the historical context of each source. (Global Experience: Readings in World

History to 1550, Vol. 1)

1. The Egyptian Creation Story: The Creation According to Ra

2. The Hebrew Creation Story: Genesis

3. P’an Ku, China’s Creation Story

4. A Hindu Creation Story: Rig Veda

5. A Greek Creation Story: Hesiod’s Theogeny

6. A Mayan Creation Story: Popol Vuh

2. Read the articles from Robinson, Diamond, and the Economist. Discuss and evaluate the historians’ varying interpretations of

the origins and outcomes of agriculture

3. Examine samples of cave art on the following websites:

 http://www.lascaux.culture.fr/#/en/00.xml

 http://www.culture.gouv.fr/culture/archeosm/en/fr-cosqu2.htm,

 http://www.culture.gouv.fr/culture/arcnat/chauvet/en/index.html

Answer the following questions:

 What were the cave artists trying to say?

 Why do you think that there were so many animals and not as many people in the paintings?

 What can the paintings tell us about other aspects of the life of cave dwellers or Paleolithic people?

 How did they make these pictures if there were no stores to buy paint and brushes or tools for carving?

 What colors are prominent in the paintings, and what natural sources might provide these pigments if they didn't have

crayons or markers?

Record answers and then study the Lascaux Web site under the sections titled "Techniques," "Archeological Artifacts," and

"Dating Methods" to see what archaeologists have concluded by studying these cave art images and how archaeologists

complete their work.

4. Review the concept of Periodization. Identify the “big issues” that bracket the time period 8,000 B.C.E. to 2,500 B.C.E.

Compare the time period of Unit 1 to the Periodization used by the author of your textbook and by the editors of the readers.

How can you account for these differences? Why do historians disagree as to how historical periods should be divided? Is

there a right or wrong answer to how to bracket world events? How might historians in different cultures view time periods

differently?

NNPS AP World History Syllabus 5

1. Primary source analysis: “What can we learn about social and economic classes in Mesopotamia through an analysis of

the Code of Hammurabi?”

2. Comparative essay – Compare the role of trade in Mesopotamia and Egypt.

3. Comparative essay – Compare the roles of women in Egypt, Mesopotamia and the Indus River Valley.

D. Assessment: Unit Test

Unit 2: Kingdoms and Empires (2,500 B.C.E. – 600 C.E.)

Time Estimate: 4 weeks, 9 extended block sessions

AP Themes: 1 – 5 VA Standards of Learning: SOL WHI 3a-e; 4a-f; 5a–g; 6a – k

Key Concepts

1.3 The Development and Interactions of Early Agricultural, Pastoral, and Urban Societies

2.1 The Development and Codification of Religious and Cultural Traditions

2.2 The Development of States and Empires

2.3 Emergence of Transregional Networks of Communication and Exchange

Topics

A. River Valleys, Greece, Rome, Han China, Africa, The Americas, and India

B. Contact and change over time

C. Trade and international connections

D. Cultural diffusion and migration of peoples

E. Collapse of classical empires

F. Interregional networks and contacts – Indian Ocean trade, Trans-Saharan trade, Silk Road

Assignments and Assessments

A. Readings

1. Textbook: Bulliet, Chapters 2–7

2. Bryn Mawr Classical Review - Walter Scheidel (ed.), Rome and China: Comparative Perspectives on Ancient World Empires.

Oxford Studies in Early Empires. Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press

3. Riley, Gerome, Lembright, Myers, and Yoon. Global Experience: Readings in World History to 1550, Vol. 1, pp. 39-42, 75-78,

92-104, 111-113, 117-125

 The Babylonian Code of Hammurabi

 Bhagavad-Gita

 Confucius, Analects

 Taoism [Daoism]: Lao Tzu [Lao Zi]

 Legalism: The Writings of Han Fei Tzu [Han Fei Zi]

 Herodotus, Persian Dialogue

 Thucydides, Peloponnesian War

B. Visual and Quantitative Sources

 The Earth and Its Peoples, Bulliet

 Ch. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 Chronology Charts (Bulliet)

 River-Valley Civilizations (Bulliet, Map 1.2)

 Ziggurat of Ur-Nammu, ca. 2100 B.C.E. (p. 21)

 Scene from the Egyptian Book of the Dead, ca. 1300 B.C.E. (p. 30)

 Vase Painting Depicting a Sacrifice to the God Apollo, ca. 440 BCE (p. 121)

 Vase Painting Depicting Women at an Athenian Fountain House, ca. 520 BCE (p. 127)

 The Roman Empire (Bulliet, Map 5.1)

 Roman Aqueduct Near Tarragona, Spain (p. 153)

 The Magic Canal (p. 154)

C. Assignments

1. Readings

 Bulliet, Chapter 5; A Republic of Farmers, p 142; An Urban Empire, p. 150; The Qin Unification of China, p. 157; The Long

Reign of the Han, p. 159; The Treatment of Slaves in Rome and China, p 148 - 149; and Water Engineering in Rome and

China, p. 154. (for comparison of the scientific and technological achievements of Rome and China through visual and text

sources that relate to water engineering)

 Bryn Mawr Classical Review of the Schiedel Book (for historical perspectives on these comparisons and for additional areas

of convergence or divergence)

NNPS AP World History Syllabus 6

2. Comparative Essay: Compare and contrast the political, social, and economic characteristics of Rome and Han China.

3. Compare the artistic techniques, images and themes (mythology and gender roles) reflected by Greek ceramics from two

different periods in time. (Bulliet, images on pp. 121 and 127) Discuss using the Art History Study Guide on “reading Greek

Vases” found at: http://cdm.reed.edu/cdm4/studyguides/vases/intro-ubiquity.html.

 Analyze the vase in terms of its iconography. What kind of scene is being portrayed? What is the relationship between the

scene and the vase’s function?

 What can be inferred from these physical artifacts about the culture and society of Ancient Greece?

4. Annotated timeline: Trace the development of Rome from its foundations (c. 750 BCE) through 600 CE by creating an

annotated timeline that includes at least 10 major events in Roman history.

5. Create a chart comparing social structures, culture, religion, politics, technology, economics, and demography from Unit 1

Foundations to Unit 2 Kingdoms and Empires. Analyze and discuss how these two periods in history differ in relation to these

concepts.

D. Assessments

1. Unit Test

2. DBQ: Analyze the causes of, and responses to, social inequality during the Classical Age (ca. 1000 BCE-500 CE). How did

one’s status within society affect one’s perspective of events in that society? (Bulliet, A6-A8)

Unit 3: Growth and Interaction of Cultural Communities (600 C.E. – 1450 C.E.)

Time Estimate: 3 weeks, 7 extended block sessions

AP Themes: 1 – 5 VA Standards of Learning: SOL WHI 7a-e; 8a-d; 9a-d; 10b-c; 11a-b

Key Concepts

3.1 Expansion and Intensification of Communication and Exchange Networks

3.2 Continuity and Innovation of State Forms and Their Interactions

Topics

A. Characteristics of the time frame, trade, technology, cultural exchange, demographic and environmental change, intellectual

development

B. Gender systems and changes

C. Development of nation states

D. Islamic World and Empires

E. China – Tang and Song dynasties, early Ming initiatives, influence on surrounding areas

F. Maya, Aztec, Inca

G. Relationship between China, Central Asia, Korea, Japan, and Vietnam

H. Byzantine and Medieval Europe

Assignments and Assessments

A. Readings

1. Textbook: Bulliet, Chapters 8–11

2. Riley, Gerome, Lembright, Myers, and Yoon. Global Experience: Readings in World History to 1550, Vol. 1, pp. 196-204,

214-218, 320-322

 The Qur’an

 One Thousand and One Nights: “The Tale of the Fisherman”

 Chinese Footbinding

B. Assignments

1. Continuity and Change over Time Essay: Evaluate the social changes and continuities over time within the Islamic World

between the years 661 CE and 1258 CE.

2. Map Analysis: Compare the patterns of diffusion for Buddhism, Islam, and Christianity. (Bulliet, pp. 204, 231, 257)

 To what places did this religion spread? How did it spread? (Military conquest, trade routes etc.)

 Compare the routes taken. How might you account for the similarities?

 What issues divided this religion into different forms or sects? Can these divisions be identified geographically?

 When this religion entered a specific region what effect did it have on existing belief systems and traditions? Did it enforce

or alter views concerning the role of women? Did it present challenges to the political authorities?

3. Using the 3 maps from Assignment 3, compare the extent of religious diffusion from the beginning of this period 600 C.E. to the

end, 1450 CE.

 Is this periodization relevant for Buddhism, Islam, and Christianity?

 How does this time frame focus the narrative about the diffusion of these religions?

 What alternative time frames could be applied?

NNPS AP World History Syllabus 7

C. Assessments

1. Unit Test

2. DBQ: Evaluate the degree that scientific discovery and technological invention developed in Muslim, Christian, and Chinese

societies during the post – Classical Age (600 CE – 1450 CE). (Bulliet, pp. A9-A13)

Review and Quarter 1 Assessment (Covers Units 1—3) Time Estimate: 2 days, 2 extended block sessions

QUARTER 2

Unit 4: Interregional Patterns of Culture and Contact (600 C.E. – 1450 C.E.)

Time Estimate: 4 weeks, 10 extended block sessions

AP Themes: 1 – 5 VA Standards of Learning: SOL WHI 10a; 10d, 12a-d, 13a-d

Key Concepts

3.1 Expansion and Intensification of Communication and Exchange Networks

3.3 Increased Economic Productive Capacity and Its Consequences

Topics

A. The Mongol empires effect on China, Russia, Middle East and Central Asia

B. Nomadic migrations, plague pandemics, growth and role of cities

C. Interregional trade patterns Silk Road, Trans-Saharan, and Indian Ocean

D. The transformations of Western Europe and Late Middle Ages

Assignments and Assessments

A. Readings

1. Textbook: Bulliet, Chapters 12–143.

2. Lynda Shaffer, Southernization Journal of World History, Spring 1994

3. Monks and Merchants, at http://sites.asiasociety.org/arts/monksandmerchants/silk3.htm

4. Riley, Gerome, Lembright, Myers, and Yoon. Global Experience: Readings in World History to 1550, Vol. 1, pp. 261-263,

305-307, 330-333, 335-337

 Ibn Battuta in Mali

 The Trial of Joan of Arc

 Marco Polo in China

 The Black Death in Florence

B. Assignments

1. Complete an Inner/Outer Circle Activity based on the Shaffer article.

2. Comparative Essay: Two Feudalisms Compared – Japan & Western Europe

3. Continuity and Change over Time Essay: Evaluate the cultural changes and continuities over time in European society from

600CE to 1450CE.

4. Visual Analysis: Study the images of the Portuguese caravel, Indian Ocean dhow, Chinese junk, and ancient Greek trireme.

(Bulliett, pp. 431, 387, 431, 125) Discuss the themes of interaction between humans and the environment and the creation,

expansion, and interaction of economic systems.

 How was each civilization's shipbuilding influenced by geography?

 Explain how each affected patterns of trade and empire building.

C. Assessments

1. Unit Test

2. DBQ: Evaluate the factors that influenced cultural and technological diffusion in Eurasia and Africa up to the year 1500CE.

(Bulliet, A24-A28)

Unit 5: Global Interaction (1450 C.E. – 1750 C. E.)

Time Estimate: 4 weeks, 10 extended block sessions

NNPS AP World History Syllabus 8

AP Themes: 1 – 5 VA Standards of Learning: SOL WHI 1a–e; 2a–e; 3a-c; 4a-f; 5d-e; 6a-d, 6f

Key Concepts

4.1 Globalizing Networks of Communication and Exchange

4.2 New Forms of Social Organization and Modes of Production

4.3 State Consolidation and Imperial Expansion

Topics

A. Characteristics of the time period – Global interaction and trade

B. Motives for European exploration

C. The Patterns of European dominance in West Africa, East Africa, Indian Ocean states, and the Americas

D. Localized trade networks in the Americas and Oceania

E. The Impact of the Protestant Reformation, Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment on European views of the world

F. Demographic and environmental changes: diseases, animals, new crops, and population movements

G. Coercive labor systems

H. Gender differences between Europe, the Americas, and Africa

I. The role of capitalism and mercantilism in the commercial revolution

Assignments and Assessments

A. Readings

1. Textbook: Bulliet, Chapters 15–18

2. Lehigh University Digital Library History on Trial (Columbus). http://digital.lib.lehigh.edu/trial/reels/films/list/0_1

3. Review Essay: Bryan Le Beau, The Rewriting of America's First Lesson in Heroism--Christopher Columbus on the Eve of the

Quincentenary

4. Riley, Gerome, Lembright, Myers, and Yoon. Global Experience: Readings in World History to 1550, Vol. 1, pp. 348-350,

364-369, 375-377, 384-385

 Suleiman the Magnificent and His Courtiers

 Niccolò Machiavelli, The Prince and The Discourses on Titus Levy

 Martin Luther at the Diet of Worms

 Cheng Ho [Zheng He]: Ming Maritime Expeditions

 Christopher Columbus, Journal of First Voyage to America

5. Stearns, et al. Documents in World History, Vol. 2. 5th ed., pp. 20-30

 The Columbian Exchange in the Early Modern Period, The Migration of Food and Diseases

 Protestantism and Women, Conservative View

B. Visual and Quantitative Sources

1. Ridley Scott film 1492-Conquest of Paradise

2. Stearns, et al. Documents in World History, Vol. 2. 5th ed., p. 29

 The Potato Eaters by Vincent Van Gogh, 1885

C. Assignments

A. Read various accounts of Columbus voyages, including the account in Riley et al, The Lehigh University Digital Library articles,

the Le Beau article, view the movie, and other sources. Based on historical analysis, participate in a mock trial of Columbus in

the classroom to determine if he was a hero or a villain.

B. CCOT Essay. Describe and analyze the cultural, economic, and political impact of Islam on one of the following regions

between 1000 and 1750: West Africa, South Asia, Europe.

C. Review the concept of Periodization. Identify the “big issues” that bracket the time period 1450 to 1750 C.E. Compare the time

period of Unit 5 to the Periodization used by the author of your textbook, and by the editors of the readers.

 How can you account for these differences?

 Why do historians disagree as to how historical periods should be divided?

 Is there a right or wrong answer to how to bracket world events?

 How might historians in different cultures view time periods differently?

D. Analyze the historical implications of variations in climate on population growth and migration. (Bulliet, population growth charts

and text sources, p. 455)

E. Create a diagram of the Columbian Exchange (Bulliet, p 491-492). Define the Columbian Exchange. What consequences did

the Columbian Exchange have on regions both beyond the Atlantic world and within it? Focus on nutrition and disease.

Explain your answer by making connections to global world history.

D. Assessments

1. Unit Test

2. DBQ: Analyze the social and political changes in the Americas and Africa from 1492 to 1750. (Bulliet, A19-A23)

NNPS AP World History Syllabus 9

Review and VA SOL World History I Test (Covers Units 1—5) Time Estimate: 1 week, 3 extended block sessions

Semester Exam (Covers Units 1—5) Time Estimate: 1 day, 1 extended block session

QUARTER 3

Unit 6: Major Civilizations in Asia and Islamic Empires (1450 C.E. – 1750C.E.)

Time Estimate: 2 weeks, 5 extended block sessions

AP Themes: 1 – 5 VA Standards of Learning: SOL WHII 5a-c

Key Concepts

4.1 Globalizing Networks of Communication and Exchange

4.2 New Forms of Social Organization and Modes of Production

4.3 State Consolidation and Imperial Expansion

Topics

A. Three gun powder empires/Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal Empires

B. Muslim influences in Southeast Asia and Coastal Africa

C. Muslim interactions with European traders

D. Changes and continuities in Confucianism

E. The Tokugawa political, economic, and political systems

F. The collapse of the Ming and rise of the Qing

G. Development and expansion of the Russian Empire

Assignments and Assessments

A. Readings

1. Textbook: Bulliet, Chapters 19–20

2. From Paul Kennedy The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers: Economic Change and Military Conflict from 1500 to 2000, Vintage

Books, 1989, found at http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/core9/phalsall/texts/kennedy-risefall.html

3. Gale Stokes, "Why the West? The Unsettled Question of Europe's Ascendancy," Lingua Franca (November 2001), 30-38.

4. Stearns, et al. Documents in World History, Vol. 2. 5th ed., pp. 74-80, 90-98, 177-181

 Conquering and Ruling India: Babur and Akbar, Mughal Documents

 Early Modern Japan, Tokugáwa Documents

 Russian Peasants: Serfdom and Emancipation, Russian Documents

B. Visual and Quantitative Sources

 Stearns, et al. Documents in World History, Vol. 2. 5th ed., pp. 79, 97

 Babur Reading in His Garden, 16th century (detail)

 Geisha with Stringed Instrument (Shamisen) and text by Kitigawa Utamaro

C. Assignments

1. Read the Kennedy and Stokes articles. Identify, compare, contrast, and discuss their points of view about the relative

advantages and strengths of empires in the Eastern Hemisphere versus the west.

2. Comparative Essay – Compare Russia’s interaction with the West with the interaction of one of the following with the West:

Ottoman Empire, China, Tokugawa Japan, and Mughal India.

3. Analyze the changes and continuities in commerce in the Indian Ocean region from 650 CE to 1750 CE

4. Compare the events that bracket the 1450 CE - 1750 CE time period in Unit 5 Global Interaction to the events that bracket the

same time period in Unit 6 Major Civilizations in Asia and Islamic Empires. Is the periodization valid for both units, for both

hemispheres?

5. Architectural Analysis: Examine the photograph of the Hagia Sophia (Aya Sofya) on p. 549. Using this image and

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/03094a.htm and http://www.princeton.edu/~asce/const_95/ayasofya.html, answer the

following:

 Who built the structure?

 What does Hagia Sophia mean?

 What kind of structure is it today?

 Where was Hagia Sophia built, and what is the city currently known as?

 Why did the dome collapse?

NNPS AP World History Syllabus 10

 Was the second dome built like the original?

 What was unique about the dome, and what happened to it?

 How is the dome situated on the walls of the building? What is the dome a symbol of?

D. Assessments

1. Unit Test

2. DBQ: Assess the validity of this statement: “The period from 1350 CE to 1750 CE was marked by increasing openness to

foreign ideas, culture, and peoples.” (Bulliet, pp. A29-A33)

Unit 7: Revolutions (1750 C.E. – 1914 C.E.)

Time Estimate: 3 weeks, 7 extended block sessions

AP Themes: 1 – 5 VA Standards of Learning: SOL WHII 6e; 7a-d; 8a-b; 9a-b

Key Concepts

5.1 Industrialization and Global Capitalism

5.2 Imperialism and Nation-State Formation

5.3 Nationalism, Revolution, and Reform

5.4 Global Migration

Topics

A. Political Revolutions and independence movements – Latin America, North America, France, Haiti, Mexico

B. Industrial Revolution

C. Changes in social, economic, and belief systems

D. Demographic and environmental changes

Assignments and Assessments

A. Readings

1. Textbook: Bulliet, Chapters 21–23

2. Stearns, et al. Documents in World History, Vol. 2. 5th ed., pp. 112-118, 127-141, 225-231

 Baroque Culture in Latin America, Samplings of Baroque Culture in Latin America

 The French Revolution and Its Aftermath, Classic Documents of the Revolution

 Work and Workers in the Industrial Revolution, Industrial Revolution Documents

 Economy and Society of Latin America, Plantation Life in Cuba and Yucatan

B. Visual and Quantitative Sources

 Stearns, et al. Documents in World History, Vol. 2. 5th ed., p. 118

 Exterior and Interior of Baroque Church, Santa María de Tonantzintla, near Cholula, Mexico

C. Assignments

1. Create a Venn diagram to compare and contrast the economic ideologies of socialism (Karl Marx) and capitalism (Adam Smith).

(Bulliet, pp. 753 and 646)

2. Analyze source documents by identifying point of view, intended purpose, audience, and historical context of each source.

Sources might include excerpts from: Locke, Montesquieu, Declaration of Independence, Declaration of the Rights of Man and

Citizen, Jamaica Letter, Adam Smith, and Karl Marx.

3. Comparative Essay: Compare the outcomes of the American, French, and Haitian Revolutions.

4. Performance Task (Choose one)

 Create a detailed resume for someone looking for a job during the Industrial Revolution. What background do you have

and what skills do you possess to be a good hire?

 Design an advertisement for an invention from this time period. The advertisement must include a picture of the invention

and the key characteristics of the invention. In addition, address how the invention will impact the lives of individuals and

the world itself.

5. Create a chart comparing social structures, culture, religion, politics, technology, economics, and demography from a previous

unit with this time period. Analyze and discuss how these two periods in history differ in relation to these concepts.

6. Using the picture of Versailles on p. 479, participate in a small group discussion of how monarchy changed with Louis XVI. List

the pros and cons of absolute and constitutional monarchies. Be prepared to share your lists with the class and to justify your

ideas.

D. Assessments

1. Unit Test

2. DBQ: How did the political and economic changes from 1750 CE to 1914CE influence the social order in Europe and the

NNPS AP World History Syllabus 11

Americas? (Bulliet, pp. A34-A38)

Unit 8: Age of Imperialism (1750C.E. – 1914 C.E.)

Time Estimate: 3 weeks, 7 extended block sessions

AP Themes: 1 – 5 VA Standards of Learning: SOL WHII 8b-d; 9b-e

Key Concepts

5.1 Industrialization and Global Capitalism

5.2 Imperialism and Nation-State Formation

5.3 Nationalism, Revolution, and Reform

5.4 Global Migration

Topics

A. Rise of nationalism, nation-states, and political movements

B. Rise of democracy – limitations

C. Imperialism and colonialism, reaction to foreign domination

D. Japan and the Meiji Restoration

E. Methods of New Imperialism in Africa, Asia, and the Pacific, including the role of the British in southern Africa, Australia, and New

Zealand

F. British influences in Africa and India

G. Responses to industrialization: trade unions and socialism

Assignments and Assessments

A. Readings

1. Textbook: Bulliet, Chapter 24–27

2. Stearns, et al. Documents in World History, Vol. 2. 5th ed., pp. 163-170, 196-212, 248-254

 European Imperialism, Documents by Lugard, Ferry, and Kipling

 The Meiji Restoration in Japan, Meiji Documents

 The 1857 Uprising in India, British and Indian Documents

 Racism in World History: The Discovery of “Personal Whiteness,” Mohandas K. Ghandi and W.E.B. DuBois

B. Visual and Quantitative Sources

 Stearns, et al. Documents in World History, Vol. 2. 5th ed., pp. 203, 211

 The Meiji Emperor in Traditional and Western-Style Dress

 “The Execution of ‘John Company.’” in Punch 33, 15 August 1857 and Photograph of the Execution of Rebels in India, 1858

C. Assignments

1. Comparative Essay: Compare and contrast the political differences among the Ottoman, Qing, and Russian empires.

2. Continuity and Change over Time Essay: Describe the continuities and changes in Western Imperialism between 1750 CE to

1914 CE.

3. Analyze and discuss the significance of 1914 as a pivotal date in world events. Does choice of date for the beginning or end of

a period privilege one point of view, or region, or group over another narrative, region, or group; therefore, changing the

historical narrative?

4. Political Cartoon Analysis: Compare and analyze French and British political cartoons portraying the French Revolution

(appropriate use of historical evidence). Identify the intended audience, purpose, point of view, argument, and context.

D. Assessments

1. Unit Test

2. DBQ: Utilizing the documents, maps, tables and charts in the released DBQ (2003), assess the connections between abolition

of plantation slavery and increased migration from Asian countries to the Americas.

Review and Quarter 3 Assessment (Covers Units 6—8) Time Estimate: 2 days, 2 extended block sessions

NNPS AP World History Syllabus 12

QUARTER 4

Unit 9: Global Conflict (1914 C.E. – 1945 C.E.)

Time Estimate: 2 weeks, 5 extended block sessions (Time adjusted as necessary based on scheduled date for AP & SOL tests)

AP Themes: 1 – 5 VA Standards of Learning: SOL WHII 10a-c; 11a-c; 12a-b

Key Concepts

6.1 Science and the Environment

6.2 Global Conflicts and Their Consequences

6.3 New Conceptualizations of Global Economy, Society, and Culture

Topics

A. Causes and Effects of The Great War and World War II

B. Russian Revolution

C. Rise of Totalitarianism

D. Global Depression

E. Indian Independence Movement

F. Development of the Mandate System and the effect on the Middle East

Assignments and Assessments

A. Readings

1. Textbook: Bulliet, Chapter 28 – 30

2. Stearns, et al. Documents in World History, Vol. 2. 5th ed., pp. 257-263, 277-286

 The Experience of World War I, Four Weeks in the Trenches and All Quiet on the Western Front

 Lenin, Stalin, and Russian Communist Society, Lenin’s Writings, Stalin and a Bitter Legacy

B. Assignment: Comparative Essay—Compare the immediate post war outcomes of World War I and World War II. Is the use of a

time frame 1914 - 1945 valid for scholarly inquiry globally? Discuss why it may or may not be not be reflective of unique “big picture”

concepts in all parts of the world.

C. Assessment: Unit Test

Unit 10: The Post War World (1945 – to the Present)

Time Estimate: 2 weeks, 5 extended block sessions (Time adjusted as necessary based on scheduled date for AP & SOL tests)

AP Themes: 1 – 5 VA Standards of Learning: SOL WHII 12c; 13a-d; 14a-c; 15a-b; 16a-d

Key Concepts

6.1 Science and the Environment

6.2 Global Conflicts and Their Consequences

6.3 New Conceptualizations of Global Economy, Society, and Culture

Topics

A. International issues – power of diplomacy, nuclear weapons, United Nations, racism and terrorism

B. New patterns of nationalism – decolonization and breakup of the Soviet Union

C. Social Reform and revolution – changing gender roles, feminism, family structure

D. Demographics and environmental change – migration, birth and death rates, urbanization, global warming and deforestation

E. Globalization

Assignments and Assessments

A. Readings

1. Textbook: Bulliet, Chapter 31 – 33

2. Trethewie, Sally, 2011 Feeding Southeast Asia in the 21st Century Policy Brief No 14. RSIS Centre for Non-Traditional Security

NNPS AP World History Syllabus 13

NTS Studies.

3. Stearns, et al. Documents in World History, Vol. 2. 5th ed., pp. 287-307, 333-338, 362-367, 389-401

 The Cold War, Cold War Documents

 The Collapse of the Soviet Union, Russian Documents: The End of an Era

 Chinese Revolutionaries: Sun Yatsen and Mao Zedong, Two Revolutionary Leaders

 Spinning Wheels, Black Flags, and a “Tryst with Destiny”: India Wins Independence, Nationalist Documents

 Latin America’s Social Crisis in the 20th Century, Latin America Struggles

 African Nationalism, African Nationalism Documents

B. Visual and Quantitative Sources

 Stearns, et al. Documents in World History, Vol. 2. 5th ed., pp. 368

 Title Page of Rashtriya Sangit Julmi Dayar by Manohar Lal Shukla, Kanpur, 1922

C. Assignments

1. Continuity and Change over Time Essay: Evaluate the social and economic factors in the Soviet Union between the years 1922

CE to 1991 CE.

2. Construct the racial and ethnic make-up of the country of South Africa utilizing two primary sources, I Write What I Like by Steve

Biko and Crying in the Wilderness by Bishop Desmond Tutu

3. Role play a mock committee session in the United Nations dealing with the ethnic conflict in Bosnia.

4. Read and discuss the Trethewie article and analyze the future role of food security in global stability.

D. Assessments

1. Unit Test

2. DBQ: Analyze the social, economic, and political challenges that women faced in the 20th century. (Bulliet, A44-A48)

Review and AP Test Time Estimate: 1-2 weeks, 3-5 extended block sessions

VA SOL World History II Test (Covers Units 6—10) Time Estimate: 1 day, 1 extended block session

Unit 11: Historical Inquiry

Time Estimate: 2 to 3 weeks, 5 to 7 extended block sessions (Time adjusted as necessary based on scheduled date for AP & SOL

tests)

AP Themes: 1 – 5 VA Standards of Learning: SOL WHII 1-15

Topics: Various, emphasis on connections to current events

Assignment: Performance Assessment

Semester Exam (Covers Units 6—10) Time Estimate: 1 day, 1 extended block session

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